Right Brain, Left Brain Blog

79 posts categorized "Business innovation"

30 August 2016

Apple's brand portfolio is the world’s most valuable


Apple has held on to its title as the world’s most valuable brand portfolio, with an estimated worth of almost $146bn*, according to the latest Brand Finance Portfolio 100, which evaluates brands to determine which are the most powerful and valuable by country and by industry.

Alphabet (Google’s parent company) takes second place on the table with a portfolio value of $99bn, followed by Samsung Group ($83bn), Wal-Mart Stores ($78bn) and Microsoft Corp ($74bn).

Also featuring in the top 10 are Amazon.com in sixth place with a value of $70bn, followed by Nestle SA ($67bn) and Verizon Communications ($63bn). At&T ($60bn) and Toyota Motor Corp ($55bn) round out the top 10.

Continue reading "Apple's brand portfolio is the world’s most valuable" »

23 August 2016

3 different things brands can learn from Pokemon Go

Pokemon go

When Satochi Tajiri first created the Pokemon concept in 1995, and released the first two Gameboy video games (red and green) a year later, he would never have envisioned middle-aged bureaucrats running round London (and every other city in the world) trying to catch them all just 20 years later.

Pokemon Go is rapidly becoming the most successful mobile app of all time. It took just 13 hours to hit the top of the US sales charts, and after a global frenzy of anticipation cut that to just 3 hours for the German charts. It’s lucrative too, topping $2 million of revenue per day in the US market, according to Yahoo.

There are lots brands can learn from Pokemon Go, but here are some you may not have considered…

Lesson 1: Reality trumps quality every time

Remember when reality TV came on the scene? “Proper” TV people bashed it, claiming a lack of production values, wit, etc. But people lapped it up anyway.

Why? Because it broke free of the studio and embraced the rough and ready unpredictability of the real world. It was closer to us and, therefore, more relevant. Pokemon Go has done the same.

In spite of its success, it’s considered a poor game by any objective measure. A Guardian review summarised it as “not a good game, but a great experience”.

The fact that it exists in the world around us, not just on our screens, means, like reality TV, that quality doesn’t matter. Take your campaigns out of their media spaces and into the world around them, and the same will apply for you.

Continue reading "3 different things brands can learn from Pokemon Go" »

05 August 2016

Ad of the Week: McCann Montevideo ‘I CANN Eau de Créativité’ (Uruguay)

Icann 1

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of McCann Montevideo, the agency has launched a limited-edition perfume called ‘I CANN Eau de Créativité’ that symbolises its commitment to creativity.

With the purpose of making it a medium to boost creativity, the idea was developed based on the idea that McCann’s role is to encourage creativity among clients and in their brand development, therefore it wanted to create a product that would boost creativity among its own people.

The thinking behind the name ‘I CANN’ emphasises that everybody can develop and express the power of their own creativity, and a campaign to promote it has been starred by agency staff.

Continue reading "Ad of the Week: McCann Montevideo ‘I CANN Eau de Créativité’ (Uruguay)" »

11 July 2016

Why brands can’t afford to ignore #Unstereotype

If brands want their advertising and marketing communications to resonate with women, then they have to understand that using simplistic one-dimensional stereotypes in their messaging no longer works.

Arguably, the statistic prompting the biggest reaction at this year’s Cannes Lions Festival was revealed by Unilever’s Keith Weed. During his presentation on why and how the FMCG giant is radically changing its female-focused advertising strategy, he announced that 40% of women do not identify with the images of them portrayed by most ads, while just 3% of Unilever’s ads feature women in leadership roles and 1% show women being funny.

As Weed disclosed more and more of the findings, a vivid picture emerged of the huge gap between how female identity is evolving and the version presented by advertising. Credit was widely given to Unilever for committing to develop more culturally relevant and resonant work to combat gender stereotyping and more accurately reflect society.

However, Weed was also keen to point out that the change in tack wasn’t just driven by altruism, but was firmly underpinned by a commercial imperative. The research not only uncovered how female identity is evolving at break-neck speed, but also highlighted the opportunity for brands to do something about it and reap the reward.

Based on work Unilever carried out with The Futures Company to identify the evolving nature of female identity, Unilever have galvanized behind their goal to create more communications which show a progressive vision of female identity, by challenging themselves on three key dimensions of how women are represented: through their role, personality and appearance.

Continue reading "Why brands can’t afford to ignore #Unstereotype" »

20 June 2016

The brands went in two by two… hurrah! hurrah!

From Laurel and Hardy to Batman and Robin, Lennon and McCartney to Wallace and Gromit; sometimes two heads are just better than one. We’ve grown up in an era where collaboration has made for some of the world’s greatest art - be that through comedy, film, music and TV.

If you transfer that knowledge into a retail environment, strategic brand partnerships can be a highly effective way to create stand out and achieve key business and sales goals for both parties involved. The power of co-branding allows you to combine the best elements that two brands have to offer and presents a unique opportunity to expand customer bases. There’s also the obvious Coca cola opi cost-saving advantage.

The most successful cross-brand promotions must present clear synergies, be relevant and complementary. Brands that share the same potential audience or audience mindset can work really well together. Take Coca-Cola and O.P.I teaming up to create a line of nail lacquers inspired by a range of Coca-Cola’s most popular drinks (Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Sprite, Fanta etc). The overarching idea linked to both brands ‘delivering happiness in a bottle’. Both have a core teen target audience so working together gave them a fresh and exciting way
to engage with this demographic. A definite win win for both. 

With any cross-brand promotional activity, the trick is to offer a unique experience to customers, something they wouldn’t ordinarily be accustomed to. In a retail environment, supporting the activity with large visual POS materials and in-store merchandising can be an eye-catching way to draw people in with compelling promotional offers.

Mondelez is a great example of a confectionery brand leading the charge in this area, most recently bringing together two of its most powerful brands – Cadbury Dairy Milk and Daim pieces – following the success of its Milka Oreo bars. Why did it work so well? Existing awareness of both individual brands enhanced the likelihood of trial and combining the two flavours offered consumers the chance to experience something new and exciting.

Continue reading "The brands went in two by two… hurrah! hurrah!" »

31 May 2016

Why brands should make participation the ultimate goal

If brands struggle with one thing in the audience engagement stakes, it’s getting people actively involved. They can develop highly creative and striking cross-channel ad campaigns, target consumers through social media and mobile, entice them with offers, boost customer experience both online and offline, and more, but arguably more valuable than all of this is driving a direct action – getting people to participate. To do this, brands need to push the boundaries of marketing a little further.

Lego is great at this. It’s Yoda Chronicles offers short tales from the legendary sci-fi story told through animated Lego figures via YouTube. It provides a safe way of presenting to kids what could otherwise be violent stories, is a wonderful soft sell for the Stars Wars Lego range, but more importantly it’s a very clever way to reinforce the world of Lego via social media using content, which is far more engaging and effective than simply advertising its toy range. What’s more, it has proved so engaging that some consumers have been creating their own Lego animations – and we all know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Essentially, this provides a great way of participating in Lego outside of the traditional brick building, while reinforcing this core proposition.


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27 April 2016

Free your social conscience

The latest Persil #DirtIsGood campaign shows just how powerful brands can be when they align themselves with the right cause, says Lou Garrod of Sense.

“Daily outdoors time is probably the most important part of my day,” says an inmate of Wabash Maximum Security Prison in Indiana, USA in the latest Persil TV ad.

“To walk out that door and feel the sun on your face, it’s everything to me,” says another.

Each inmate is allowed at least two hours outside ‘yard time’ every day. But what has this got to do with Persil?

Continue reading "Free your social conscience" »

15 February 2016

Super Bowl 50 Reflections: Why MINI's Big Tent strategy was the real winner

All in all, Super Bowl 50 was probably not the best year for creative, but one campaign stood out head and shoulders above the mass of mediocrity.

The annual sporting extravaganza yet again served up some of the highest budget campaigns of the year, with brands vying to compete for the attention of a worldwide audience. Overall, humour and celebrities were the core themes of the day, but despite brands forking out a record $5 million for a 30-second spot at the big game, the quality of creative left a lot to be desired.

While various companies had their own scoring systems – from social buzz to video virality and brand sentiment – there was one ad in particular that beat its rivals by capturing a key marketing quality that stands for something much bigger in the long-term – and it was the ad that most resonated with me.

Continue reading "Super Bowl 50 Reflections: Why MINI's Big Tent strategy was the real winner" »

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  • Right Brain, Left Brain sums up the dichotomy of a media business that’s constantly battling with the challenge of delivering a profit and discovering new ways to communicate to consumers. The Cream editorial team combined with a dream team of industry pioneers from around the world share their expert opinions.

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