Right Brain, Left Brain Blog

455 posts categorized "Left Brain: knowledge, trends, deals"

26 September 2016

Video Ad Trends: Marketers look to formats beyond pre-roll [Infographic]

As the UK online video advertising market continues to mature, advertisers and buyers are moving away from a focus on larger, traditional pre-roll video towards buying more strategic and varied video solutions, according to programmatic digital brand advertising company Collective’s 2016 UK Online Video Advertising Market Report

The annual report, which drew together the thoughts of over 100 key video buyers from across the top 30 media agencies, revealed that while Broadcaster Video On Demand (VOD) still takes the lion’s share of video advertising spend, clients are increasing their investment in display, YouTube, social channels and other more niche providers. 

“As advertisers take advantage of an increasing number of video solutions outside of the traditional pre-roll market, the responsibility for who buys online video has also changed,” said Simon Stone, Commercial Director, Collective. “Video budgets are increasingly being allocated from TV to digital teams. We have seen a shift in the market since launching both our native and YouTube video products in the last year. There has also been a huge increase in the number of display campaigns that include video assets.” 

For more insights into Collective's 2016 UK Online Video Advertising Market Report, check out the infographic below:

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16 September 2016

5 tips for brand collaboration with content creators

Brands should focus on content creativity if they want to increase their sales. Well that’s the lesson that came out of a new piece research from Yahoo, unveiled at Dmexco this week.

The study, which focused on the attitudes of Tumblr users towards brand content, found that more than two thirds (68%) of daily users in the UK and Germany are more likely to buy from brands that share content they like on social media. In fact, almost three quarters (74%) of respondents agreed that brands can sometimes come up with the most entertaining content. A further 70% said that the source of content doesn’t matter, as long as it provides value and is something they want to read or watch.

The power of influencers was perhaps the most interesting of the findings. Three in four daily Tumblr users feel closer to a brand when it uses influencers to reach them. [Note from Cream Ed: Check out the winner of the brand new for 2016: Best Use of an Influencer category at this year’s M&M Global Awards].

Off the back of the new research, Yahoo has offered five guiding principles to for brands to consider when collaborating with content creators. Check them out below:

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30 August 2016

Apple's brand portfolio is the world’s most valuable

Apple

Apple has held on to its title as the world’s most valuable brand portfolio, with an estimated worth of almost $146bn*, according to the latest Brand Finance Portfolio 100, which evaluates brands to determine which are the most powerful and valuable by country and by industry.

Alphabet (Google’s parent company) takes second place on the table with a portfolio value of $99bn, followed by Samsung Group ($83bn), Wal-Mart Stores ($78bn) and Microsoft Corp ($74bn).

Also featuring in the top 10 are Amazon.com in sixth place with a value of $70bn, followed by Nestle SA ($67bn) and Verizon Communications ($63bn). At&T ($60bn) and Toyota Motor Corp ($55bn) round out the top 10.

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11 July 2016

Why brands can’t afford to ignore #Unstereotype

If brands want their advertising and marketing communications to resonate with women, then they have to understand that using simplistic one-dimensional stereotypes in their messaging no longer works.

Arguably, the statistic prompting the biggest reaction at this year’s Cannes Lions Festival was revealed by Unilever’s Keith Weed. During his presentation on why and how the FMCG giant is radically changing its female-focused advertising strategy, he announced that 40% of women do not identify with the images of them portrayed by most ads, while just 3% of Unilever’s ads feature women in leadership roles and 1% show women being funny.

As Weed disclosed more and more of the findings, a vivid picture emerged of the huge gap between how female identity is evolving and the version presented by advertising. Credit was widely given to Unilever for committing to develop more culturally relevant and resonant work to combat gender stereotyping and more accurately reflect society.

However, Weed was also keen to point out that the change in tack wasn’t just driven by altruism, but was firmly underpinned by a commercial imperative. The research not only uncovered how female identity is evolving at break-neck speed, but also highlighted the opportunity for brands to do something about it and reap the reward.

Based on work Unilever carried out with The Futures Company to identify the evolving nature of female identity, Unilever have galvanized behind their goal to create more communications which show a progressive vision of female identity, by challenging themselves on three key dimensions of how women are represented: through their role, personality and appearance.

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25 June 2016

The hot topics dominating Cannes Lions 2016

The yearly arrival of Cannes Lions is hard to miss. La Croisette transforms into a Silicon Valley outpost with super-sized ad tech yachts lining the French Riviera – perfectly demonstrated by Terence Kawaja’s Cannes 2016 yacht LUMAscape – and rosé consumption skyrockets.

This week, when they weren’t battling with Wi-Fi issues or pausing to Snapchat, the world’s leading advertising and tech experts were discussing the trends tipped to transform the industry in the next 12 months.

So which topics stood out? Here are four key takeaways:

‘Bad’ advertising is dead

Ad blocking was everywhere — discussed by everyone from Piers Morgan to Iggy Pop. But this year we moved from simply talking about the problem to looking at solutions, and it seems the industry is determined to stop the technology arms race of blocking software and anti-blockers by eradicating bad ads.

Discussions cited one of the chief causes of consumer dissatisfaction as the growing volume of irrelevant and intrusive ads, and emphasised the importance of delivering quality. It was almost universally acknowledged that targeted ads can evoke positive responses, but only if the industry raises its game.

Attendees agreed that marketing must be focused on adding value to the user’s digital experience, with suggestions to improve relevance including the use of mobile location data to build a complete picture of individuals and ensure marketing messages can be adapted to them in real-time.

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17 June 2016

Brands are becoming like people… but unfortunately the kind we hate

Sense

At some point in your life you’ve probably heard something along the lines of “if companies were people, they’d be psychopaths”. This always used to strike me as a touch unfair, as obviously this is a classic case of comparing apples with oranges. However, unfair or not, this perception has been confirmed by a recent piece of research* into opinions on brand behaviour held by 2,000 members of the British public.

What doesn’t help is that the apples have started to behave like the oranges, as in recent years brands have increasingly encroached into what might be seen as “human” space. An obvious example would be their prevalence on social channels, which were designed to bring people (not brands) together, and thus has seen many of them attempt to employ friendly and personal behaviour to fit in with their new surroundings. This “matey” approach has filtered through into wider advertising in the shape of “tone of voice” and “brand personality”, and when combined with a constant thirst for “engagement” (rather than simply awareness and comprehension) has left our relationships with brands far more “intimate” than in the old days of one-way ad spots.

The catch for brands in this new paradigm is that if you want to play by human rules, you’re going to be held up to human standards, and this is where things become tricky for them.

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31 May 2016

Why brands should make participation the ultimate goal

If brands struggle with one thing in the audience engagement stakes, it’s getting people actively involved. They can develop highly creative and striking cross-channel ad campaigns, target consumers through social media and mobile, entice them with offers, boost customer experience both online and offline, and more, but arguably more valuable than all of this is driving a direct action – getting people to participate. To do this, brands need to push the boundaries of marketing a little further.

Lego is great at this. It’s Yoda Chronicles offers short tales from the legendary sci-fi story told through animated Lego figures via YouTube. It provides a safe way of presenting to kids what could otherwise be violent stories, is a wonderful soft sell for the Stars Wars Lego range, but more importantly it’s a very clever way to reinforce the world of Lego via social media using content, which is far more engaging and effective than simply advertising its toy range. What’s more, it has proved so engaging that some consumers have been creating their own Lego animations – and we all know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Essentially, this provides a great way of participating in Lego outside of the traditional brick building, while reinforcing this core proposition.

Lego

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15 February 2016

Super Bowl 50 Reflections: Why MINI's Big Tent strategy was the real winner

All in all, Super Bowl 50 was probably not the best year for creative, but one campaign stood out head and shoulders above the mass of mediocrity.

The annual sporting extravaganza yet again served up some of the highest budget campaigns of the year, with brands vying to compete for the attention of a worldwide audience. Overall, humour and celebrities were the core themes of the day, but despite brands forking out a record $5 million for a 30-second spot at the big game, the quality of creative left a lot to be desired.

While various companies had their own scoring systems – from social buzz to video virality and brand sentiment – there was one ad in particular that beat its rivals by capturing a key marketing quality that stands for something much bigger in the long-term – and it was the ad that most resonated with me.

Continue reading "Super Bowl 50 Reflections: Why MINI's Big Tent strategy was the real winner" »

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  • Right Brain, Left Brain sums up the dichotomy of a media business that’s constantly battling with the challenge of delivering a profit and discovering new ways to communicate to consumers. The Cream editorial team combined with a dream team of industry pioneers from around the world share their expert opinions.

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