Right Brain, Left Brain Blog

869 posts categorized "Right Brain: creativity, innovation, ideas"

16 March 2015

Top 5 Augmented Reality Outdoor Campaigns

Top 5 Augmented Reality blog image

Augmented reality isn’t necessarily a new concept in outdoor advertising. Back in 2011, Lynx used the technology for their Fallen Angels campaign in London, Victoria Station, where virtual angels fell to earth via the station’s big screen.

Here are 5 recent examples of innovative outdoor campaigns that are using augmented reality technology to add a new dimension to their experiential and guerrilla marketing.

Skoda Fabia

In February 2015 at London’s Waterloo Station, passers-by were able to interact with a touch screen display and customise their own version of the Skoda Fabia. With 14 colours, 5 interiors and 3 concepts to choose from, once they’d chosen from one of 90 possible designs, the customised vehicle appeared on the screen in real time. A great example of how AR can give consumers more control during a campaign.

 

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10 March 2015

Customer experience is not just for customers

Retail brands don’t know how good they have it. Debate has recently centred on how online and offline retailers could provide consistent “customer experience”, and thus encourage loyalty. It’s a conundrum, sure, but more than that I’d suggest it’s an opportunity.

Any brand with a complex customer infrastructure has unique brand-building capabilities. This is not about providing great service, consistency, or usefulness (important as these things are), it’s about having a canvas on which to paint “strategic idiosyncrasies”, which build on your brand’s advertising proposition.

If you think about it, in this age of “word of mouth”, “social media”, and “the worldwide web”, the way a company actually operates gets a huge amount of exposure. However, people being people, the type of thing that hogs this exposure will not be timely delivery, or courteous service – it will be the quirky differences that are unique to that company. Talkable stuff. The geniuses in Apple stores, the navigation trails through IKEA, your name on the coffee cup in Starbucks – if you design these differences with your marketing goals in mind, then hey presto, you’ve created effective WOM advertising within your actual company, whilst simultaneously improving your customer experience and building clearer links between your brand and product.

Taking this customer-experience-as-strategic-brand-building approach makes complex brand/buyer relationships not daunting, but exciting. 

Think about a car manufacturer. The touchpoints are endless. There are the phone calls, the test drive booking, the dealership experience, the test drive itself, the purchase process, the customisation, the servicing, the courtesy car, the process of selling the car back to them… all of these are brimming with potential for a unique brand twist.

And that’s only thinking about the “standard” customer moments. The manufacturer can build on these any way they want – events, anniversary presents, concierge services, valeting, foot rubs, you name it. Every tiny interaction has the potential to be something that will play as advertising to the world at large, and build the brand in the eyes of future customers.

So, retailers? They get no sympathy from me. The guys that I shed a tear for are those with such one dimensional customer relationships they never have the chance to exploit these processes – the poor FMCG brands.

When we look at Forbe’s list of the world’s top 20 brands, only one is FMCG (Coca-Cola, who are hardly a fair comparison), whereas 12 are brands with physical retail spaces. Now I wouldn’t suggest that this customer experience potential is the sole reason for this imbalance, but still it’s an interesting observation. Is a “strategically idiosyncratic” customer experience useful in building a powerful brand? Surely yes.

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13 February 2015

O2 gears up for Six Nations clash with holographic body mapping projection

In local news, here’s a pretty cool campaign from UK telecoms brand O2 as it builds up to tomorrow’s Six Nations clash between England and Italy (February 14). The naughty scamps have been touring the UK this week and projecting England Rugby shirts onto famous statues. But the really cool part – each has been bodymapped using cutting-edge holographic technology. Now, that’s what we like to see here at Cream!

O2 1

As an England Rugby sponsor, the activation is part of O2’s #WearTheRose Six Nations campaign. This particular activation has been led by brand experience and innovation agency CURB Media (the same guys behind Paddy Power’s Sky Tweets campaign – it figures, right?).

In the late hours of Wednesday evening, statues in nine cities around the UK ‘wore’ the England Rugby shirt, which were projected thanks to bodymapping holographic technology.

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29 January 2015

Print Ad of the Week: Responsible Young Drivers Campaign (Belgium)

Let’s face it, we’re always glued to our smartphones and social media has a major role to play in that. Everyone does it, there’s nothing wrong with it. But there’s one place where it isn’t alright and that’s on the road, when driving.

Responsible Young Drivers, a road safety volunteer organisation for and by young drivers in Belgium, are honing in on that message and ad agency ESA Saint Luc Tournai has created an impressive series of print ads to illustrate the point, all captioned with: “[Facebook/Twitter/Snapchat] have no place on the road. Using the phone while driving is responsible for 1 accident in every 10.”

Check them out below:

Drive fb

 

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13 January 2015

Four ways retailers manipulate your senses [infographic]

If you notice that display racks this holiday season are nicely scented, it’s not just shops are tidier at year’s end. Scents like citrus and floral can make you linger and stay alert in the shop to buy more. Marketers believe scents do sell, with an increasing number of scientific studies backing such claims, that the whole act spawned a new marketing sub-industry: scent marketing. It reminds us of germ warfare, an unseen weaponry that has your wallet in the crosshairs.

Real estate agents are already deploying this trick to unsuspecting buyers; the smell of freshly baked goods is said to encourage prospects to buy property during ocular visits. Similarly, talcum powder makes you feel nostalgic and, perhaps, want to buy that cushioned reading chair you don’t need.

The use of scent is just one of four sensory marketing tricks being used on us by shops eager for more sales. Collated in the new infographic below you can find a number of scientific studies that indicate what we see, hear or touch affect our buying decisions. You’ll be surprised at some of the seemingly unrelated factors that have a profound effect on your shopping. In one experiment published in the Harvard Business Review, participants were found to be a harder bargainer when sitting on a hard chair.

Likewise, you may already know that colors have meanings. For instance, sale signs are in red (urgency) and many insurance logos are in blue (trust). You’ll also get an idea how a number of your favorite shops, such as Bloomingdale’s, Apple Store, and Nike Town, lure you by playing tricks on your senses. Do you know why Apple Store leaves its notebook display half-open, or why you suddenly crave for a tropical vacation while inside Bloomingdale’s?

Check out the infographic and see what tricks retailers play on you:

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02 December 2014

Brands aren’t entertainers – they’re better than that

Advertising has always tried to copy entertainment. It appears in the same places, plays by the same general rules, and since we’re living in a golden age for the arts, the creative premium for advertising has never been higher. The subtlety of the best now often escapes easy description, playing with tone, feel, pacing and irony in ways out of reach for the majority of work. Ideas that sounded great on paper, when filtered through the inevitable compromise and committee, can easily be rendered gauche and bland.

It wasn’t always this way. Back in the day when the bulk of our entertainment came from four grainy channels and dog-eared Dick Francis novels, we were pretty easy to impress. This made marketing quite a bit easier, since we were all capable of producing something that could command forgiving attention spans. 

But now we’re spoiled. Our exposure to intricate and plentiful expanses of content has chiselled our palates to a level of discernment that feels distaste at even the tiniest misstep or incongruence. 

Applying this discernment to advertising (and why wouldn’t we, it invites the comparison), has produced the highest absolute quality of work we’ve ever seen, but simultaneously the lowest ever relative quality in comparison to the public’s standards and tastes.

How can brands survive this situation?

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07 November 2014

A young boy, some snow and a penguin… It must be the new John Lewis Christmas ad!

There’s a chill in the air, the days are getting shorter and John Lewis has just released its 2014 Christmas campaign, which can only mean one thing: Christmas is well and truly coming…

That’s right, the eagerly-awaited John Lewis ad hit the internet yesterday and while it had a lot to live up to following last year’s Bear & Hare animated campaign, I think we can safely say it didn’t fail to deliver. Hats off to Adam&Eve/DDB, once again.

John lewis

The heart-warming tale follows the story of a young boy and his penguin friend Monty. Set to the track ‘Real Love’ performed by Tom Odell, it shows the friends playing happily throughout the year until Monty becomes sad and realises he wants a companion. So, on Christmas Day, Sam gives his friend a female penguin called Mabel and the ad concludes with the strapline ‘Give someone the Christmas they’ve been dreaming of’.

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29 October 2014

Has Air NZ created ‘The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made’?

Continuing its long tradition of creating memorable and entertaining in-flight safety videos, Dwarves, Orcs and Elves are set to take flight once again as Air New Zealand unveils The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made ahead of the December release of the final film in The Hobbit Trilogy.

The safety video features members of the cast from all three films in the Trilogy including Elijah Wood (Frodo Baggins), Dean O’Gorman (Fili the Dwarf) and Sylvester McCoy (Radagast) – as well as a special cameo from the director, Sir Peter Jackson, and some other familiar faces.

The new video follows the airline’s first Hobbit-inspired safety video – An Unexpected Briefing (2012) – which attracted more than 12 million global online video views, generating huge social media coverage. The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made wraps up a successful three-year association between the airline and The Hobbit films.

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  • Right Brain, Left Brain sums up the dichotomy of a media business that’s constantly battling with the challenge of delivering a profit and discovering new ways to communicate to consumers. The Cream editorial team combined with a dream team of industry pioneers from around the world share their expert opinions.

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